Monthly Archives: July 2013

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KENAF – (a.k.a) – Mesta or Ambari

KENAF

Kenaf, (species Hibiscus cannabinus), fast-growing plant of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae) and its fibre, one of the bast fibre group. It is used mainly as a jute substitute. The plant grows wild in Africa, where the fibre is sometimes known as Guinea hemp, and has been cultivated on the Indian subcontinent, where it is usually known as mesta, or ambari, since prehistoric times.

Kenaf was unknown in the West until late in the 18th century, when cordage and sacking made from the fibre were brought to Europe. It remained one of the less important bagging materials until World War II, when shortages of jute and other bagging fibres led to a new interest that continued after the war, as supplies of established materials remained insufficient and prices increased. In Cuba, the United States, and similarly affected countries, governments encouraged cultivation of kenaf, and production became increasingly mechanized.

The plant is an herbaceous annual with stalks growing to about 18 feet (5.5 metres) in height and fibre concentrated mainly in the lower portion. The leaves are composed of five lance-shaped lobes occurring mainly near the stalk top; the flowers, pale yellow with purple centres, are borne on short stalks growing from the upper angles between leaf stalks and stems.

Kenaf, although adaptable to various soils, grows best in well-drained, sandy loam and requires a warm, moist climate, tropical or subtropical, without excessively heavy rains or strong winds. Some varieties need at least 12 hours of light each day throughout the growing season. Kenaf is less demanding on the soil than jute and may be grown in rotation with other crops. Dense sowing is common, except when cultivation is for seed production. Crops are hand-harvested, yielding the best fibre at the flowering stage. Fibres are usually separated from the stalks mechanically, although in some areas retting, followed by hand stripping, is still practiced. The fibre strands, about 3 feet (0.9 metre) long, are pale in colour and lustrous, with strength comparable to that of jute. Leading producers include India, Thailand, andChina.

Kenaf, still fairly new to international trade, is used mainly for cordage, canvas, and sacking but is receiving increased consideration for other products, such as newsprint and carpet-backing yarn. Studies begun in the 1950s demonstrated that kenaf, which reaches its mature height in less than six months, is easier to process, produces a higher yield, and has stronger fibres than plants grown for wood chips.

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Swami Prem Parivartan – a.k.a – Peepal Baba [The Man Who Planted Trees]

Peepal Baba was born in 1966 in Chandigarh, India. Born to a medical doctor in the Indian Army, he had the opportunity to travel across the country at a young age. He fell in love with the mountains, rivers and forests at a very young age. By the age of ten he started planting trees in his neighborhood. The hobby grew into a passion soon enough.

Peepal Baba has been planting trees since January 1977. Based in Delhi, India, he travels all over the country to make efforts at spreading awareness for planting trees. He delivers talks and lectures to villagers, community gatherings, and students, institutions to create awareness towards importance of planting more and more trees.

peepal-babawww.givemetrees.org

Peepal baba has himself planted several thousand of trees. He has been a role model for many. His enthusiasm and determination has inspired many to protect and plant trees. His life is dedicated to the increase of green cover on our planet.

Today, at the age of 45, he goes about planting trees wherever he is invited. He is invited by families, institutions, communities, villages to inform them and inspire them to increase their green cover.

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