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Top 5: Why not to plant bamboo in your garden ?

Bamboo is a trendy star of the eco-friendly construction movement, with a wide variety of flooring, furniture and other items being manufactured with the strong, fast-growing grass. However, bamboo production should be left to commercial growers. Bamboo’s hardiness and rapid growth make it a problematic plant for most yards. Here are the top five reasons not to plant bamboo in your garden. Bamboo may seem like an attractive garden option, but it poses serious problems. Stick to a lucky bamboo in a small indoor pot, or avoid growing bamboo altogether.

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.1. Bamboo can spread into neighboring yards. Many homeowners plant bamboo to create a fast-growing privacy screen around their home. Ted Jordan Meredith, author of “Bamboo for Gardens,” notes that some bamboo species can grow more than three feet per day. Bamboo can spread as quickly as it grows, and it doesn’t respect fences or property lines. Bamboo grows particularly vigorously when adjacent to irrigated lawns and gardens or in low-lying areas that collect water. Instead of just blocking the view of nosy neighbors, you could be turning your property line into a war zone by planting bamboo. Some bamboo species may even be categorized as noxious weeds, meaning a neighbor could legally force you to remove your bamboo. You could also be liable for the cost of any damage to the neighbors’ property caused by your bamboo, and for the cost of removal from their property.

.2. Bamboo can be an invasive threat to biodiversity. Bamboo that spreads and escapes your yard can also cause ecological problems. Many spreading bamboo species are categorized as invasive exotic plants that crowd out native plants and threaten biodiversity. The best ways to contain spreading bamboo can be expensive and complicated, and may not be worth pursuing for many homeowners. Moreover, they are not foolproof. Experts at the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office recommend burying thick 60-ml polypropylene or fiberglass about three feet deep, and leaving another two inches of material above the soil to inhibit surface spreading. Morgan Judy of Clemson University Cooperative Extension suggests creating a solid barrier made of concrete, metal or pressure-treated wood at least 18 inches deep around the bamboo. Any of these barriers should stop shallow bamboo rhizomes from spreading, but Judy still recommends closely monitoring the area for escaping shoots, particularly during the early summer peak growing season.

.3. Getting rid of bamboo can take years. Bamboo is a long-term relationship that should not be entered lightly. It may take years and vigorous effort to remove unwanted bamboo. The first step in removing bamboo is to remove all the root mass and rhizomes. This is easier said than done, and many homeowners with bamboo-loving neighbors complain they can’t get rid of the spreading grass. No matter how much they dig, the shoots keep coming back. Judy suggests frequent mowing can deplete and starve the bamboo, but it take at least two years of regular mowing to see any results.

.4. Getting rid of bamboo may require herbicides. Moreover, Judy notes that chemical herbicides are often necessary for controlling bamboo. This can be a problem for those trying to maintain organic gardens and avoid herbicide use. She recommends Roundup Original, Quick Kill Grass and Weed Killer and other herbicides containing glyphosate. This broad-spectrum herbicide has minimal residual soil activity and typically kills only the plants that are directly sprayed. Mow or chop the bamboo and let it regrow until new leaves expand. Then spray the herbicide on the leaves. Again, this could take years. One application will not solve your bamboo problem. Also, Judy warns that only specialized glyphosate herbicides should be used near creeks, ponds and other surface water. Eraser AQ, Pondmaster and other products are approved for use near water.

.5. The right bamboo can be hard to find. Bamboo’s defenders will argue that not all of the more than 1,000 bamboo species are equally invasive. They recommend clumping bamboo species rather than spreading types. The problem is that even clumping species spread, albeit not as vigorously. It also can be hard to differentiate between the types, and some are mislabeled. Moreover, other similar invasive species may be confused with bamboo. For example, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension officials warn against transplanting or encouraging the giant reed (Arundo donax), a bamboo look-alike that has invaded parts of their state.

Bamboo may seem like an attractive garden option, but it poses serious problems. Stick to a lucky bamboo in a small indoor pot, or avoid growing bamboo altogether. Moreover, do your homework before buying bamboo flooring and other products. It may not be as eco-friendly or durable as you think.

Say No to Concretisation, let our “Mother Earth” breath.

Concretisation of Trees space, leads to death of Our Friends (trees) and  Our (We, My Children & Grand Children) Future.

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what is Concretisation ?

The concretisation of trees in city has been an ongoing process, not necessarily as a result of any planned strategy to damage, fell or reduce the number of trees in city, but large as a callousness and ignorance of city people towards the needs and rights of our tree friends.

Concretisation is a fiscal drive. It is a fact that each bit of soil is being covered in different parts of the the city, be it in the residential colonies, on the main avenues or even in institutional areas and campuses etc.

Why is it happening ? (More area under concrete implies more money)

One probable reason for this high rate and pace of concretisation activity is that each square feet of concretisation entails a particular charge/ rate by the civic agencies involved. Thus, with more concretisation, more money can be made by the contractor and even the agencies involved in the concretisation process. Then, there is the added pressure from the corruption that is plaguing our society today, which is also known to be manifested in this form.  More area under concrete implies more money.

The Myth, Loose soil in city is understood as an unnecessary cause of dust in people’s house. Nothing however can be far from the truth. The dust in City’s air is largely a result of the desertification of city, which is again a result of the cutting and felling of large number of trees. Unaware of this fact, city people think or equate soil with dirt and germs and for them loose soil is also a big waste since it makes for very bad parking space.

Where is it needed the most ?

It needs to be noted that in reality, choosing the concrete way is usually very expensive and used only  at places where there is heavy vehicles movement, e.g. roads and highways. At the same time, leaving areas without concrete often requires it to be maintained with greens and trees, for which no one seems to have the consideration or the patience.

Also Read: DECONCRETISATION not possible without People Support.

Composting – What, Why & How to Compost ?

What is Compost ?

Compost is organic material that can be used as a soil amendment or as a medium to grow plants. Mature compost is a stable material with a content called humus that is dark brown or black and has a soil-like, earthy smell. It is created by: combining organic wastes (e.g., yard trimmings, food wastes, manures) in proper ratios into piles, rows, or vessels; adding bulking agents (e.g., wood chips) as necessary to accelerate the breakdown of organic materials; and allowing the finished material to fully stabilize and mature through a curing process.

Natural composting, or biological decomposition, began with the first plants on earth and has been going on ever since. As vegetation falls to the ground, it slowly decays, providing minerals and nutrients needed for plants, animals, and microorganisms. Mature compost, however, includes the production of high temperatures to destroy pathogens and weed seeds that natural decomposition does not destroy.

 

Benefits of Composting:

  • Reduce or eliminate the need for chemical fertilizers.
  • Promote higher yields of agricultural crops.
  • Facilitate reforestation, wetlands restoration, and habitat revitalization efforts by amending contaminated, compacted, and marginal soils.
  • Cost-effectively remediate soils contaminated by hazardous waste.
  • Remove solids, oil, grease, and heavy metals from stormwater runoff.
  • Avoids Methane and leachate formulation in landfills.
  • Capture and destroy 99.6 percent of industrial volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in contaminated air. See Innovative Uses of Compost: Bioremediation and Pollution Prevention.
  • Provide cost savings of at least 50 percent over conventional soil, water, and air pollution remediation technologies, where applicable. See Analysis of Composting as an Environmental Remediation Technology
  • Reduces the need for water, fertilizers, and pesticides.
  • Serves as a marketable commodity and is a low-cost alternative to standard landfill cover and artificial soil amendments.
  • Extends municipal landfill life by diverting organic materials from landfills.

 

Materials to be used for Composting

Food Waste – More food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other single material in municipal solid waste (MSW). In 2010 alone, more than 34 million tons of food waste was generated, with only three percent diverted from landfills and incinerators for composting. Reducing the amount of food wasted has significant economic, social & environmental benefits.

Yard & Wood Waste – When you throw yard waste away with your trash it is sent to a landfill where it takes up space and produces methane gas, which contributes to global climate change. Burning of yard waste, such as leaves and trimmings, creates air pollution and is a fire hazard. That is why many communities ban or restrict trashing or burning yard waste. Many communities now have drop-off sites or curbside collection programs for yard waste. Or better yet, don’t let your yard trimmings go to “waste” in the first place. so goes for the wood waste doing a home renovation project? Consider donating any unused or recoverable building materials to a charity in your area. You can also purchase recovered wood and recycling wood products. Clearing your land as part of routine maintenance or cleaning up after a storm?

BioSolids – Biosolids are the nutrient-rich organic materials resulting from the treatment of sewage sludge (the name for the solid, semisolid or liquid untreated residue generated during the treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment facility). When treated and processed, sewage sludge becomes biosolids which can be safely recycled and applied as fertilizer to sustainably improve and maintain productive soils and stimulate plant growth.