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Green Article : Recycle-Reuse-Reduce Consumption and Waste

The principle of Reduce Reuse Recycle cannot be over-emphasized.

As we reduce our consumption (especially of goods), the world would have less need for energy and resources (especially raw materials), and in the process produce less pollution (whether via the manufacturing industries, or the disposal of waste created through consumption).

REDUCE – As we reduce our waste, we would need to use less energy and resources for handling our unwanted waste. There would be less pollution arising from the landfills and the incinerators.

REUSE – Reusing helps us to reduce our consumption of new materials, as well as help to reduce the waste that we create as an entire population.

RECYCLE – Recycling allows us to reuse the materials in unwanted items to make new items. In this way, valuable resources that would otherwise contribute to pollution (eg. non-biodegradable materials or materials that release harmful substances when burnt) can be diverted away from landfills and incinerators and given a new lease of life in new products. Beyond environmental benefits of recycling, recycling also benefits the human economy and can be political.

GREEN SOLUTION. GET GREEN.

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle!

Sunflower seed husks provide concrete alternative – Turkey

Ordinarily seen as a waste product, the husks of sunflower seeds could be used to make concrete, according to research out of Turkey. Not only are the husks a sustainable source of aggregate, it’s claimed that the resulting concrete is more resistant to cracking during post-freeze thaws.

However, the researchers report that with greater concentrations of husk, the concrete would only be suitable for use as an insulating material. Lower husk density results in a lightweight concrete that could conceivably be used for construction purposes, though the researchers suggest this should be restricted to agriculture buildings a single story tall.

Having a high calorific value sunflower seed husks can also be formed into pellets for use as a biomass fuel.

The research was carried out by Can Burak Sisman and Erhan Gezer, engineers at Turkey’s Namik Kemal University. The research appeared in the International Journal of Environment and Waste Management.